The Golden Spiders (Nero Wolfe #22) (Mass Market)

The Golden Spiders (Nero Wolfe #22) By Rex Stout Cover Image

The Golden Spiders (Nero Wolfe #22) (Mass Market)

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This is book number 22 in the Nero Wolfe series.

Nero Wolfe was almost as famous for his wealthy clients and extravagant fees as for his genius at detection. So why has he accepted a case for $4.30? And why have the last two people to hire him been ruthlessly murdered? Wolfe suspects the answers may lie in the story of a twelve-year-old boy who turns up at the door of his West Thirty-fifth Street brownstone. In short order, Wolfe finds himself confronted by one of his most perplexing and pressing cases, involving a curious set of clues: a gray Cadillac, a mysterious woman, and a pair of earrings shaped like spiders dipped in gold. The case is all boiling down to a strange taste of greed—and a grumpy gourmand’s unappeasable appetite for truth.
 
Introduction by Linda Barnes
 
“It is always a treat to read a Nero Wolfe mystery. The man has entered our folklore.”—The New York Times Book Review
 
A grand master of the form, Rex Stout is one of America’s greatest mystery writers, and his literary creation Nero Wolfe is one of the greatest fictional detectives of all time. Together, Stout and Wolfe have entertained—and puzzled—millions of mystery fans around the world. Now, with his perambulatory man-about-town, Archie Goodwin, the arrogant, gourmandizing, sedentary sleuth is back in the original seventy-three cases of crime and detection written by the inimitable master himself, Rex Stout.
Rex Stout (1886–1975) wrote dozens of short stories, novellas, and full-length mystery novels, most featuring his two indelible characters, the peerless detective Nero Wolfe and his handy sidekick, Archie Goodwin.
Product Details ISBN: 9780553277807
ISBN-10: 0553277804
Publisher: Crimeline
Publication Date: June 1st, 1995
Pages: 224
Language: English
Series: Nero Wolfe
“It is always a treat to read a Nero Wolfe mystery. The man has entered our folklore.”The New York Times Book Review