BSB: Poetry Reading with Jonathan Andersen and Margaret Gibson

Bank Square Books presents a poetry reading with local poets Jonathan Andersen (Augur) and new Connecticut Poet Laureate Margaret Gibson (Not Hearing the Wood Thrush). This event is free and open to the public.

About Jonathan Andersen

Jonathan Andersen was born in New London and grew up in East Lyme with his fraternal twin brother Phillip in an old farmhouse that had been in the family for a number of generations. Andersen is the author of Augur (Red Dragonfly Press, 2018), awarded the David Martinson-Meadowhawk Poetry Prize. Other books include Stomp and Sing (Curbstone Press/Northwestern University Press, 2005) and, as editor, Seeds of Fire: Contemporary Poetry from the Other U.S.A. (Smokestack Books, 2008).

He has been a featured reader in venues in the eastern United States, and in Europe, including the Ledbury Poetry Festival, the 49th International Festival of Literature in Belgrade, and the 42nd Smederevo Poetry Autumn. His poems have appeared in many print and online publications, such as The Café Review, Connecticut Review, Counterpunch, Freshwater, Here, North American Review, The Progressive, Rattle, and The Worcester Review, among others.

For twelve years he was a high school English and special education teacher, and since 2008 he has been a professor of English at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Danielson and Willimantic. He and his wife, fellow poet and educator Denise Abercrombie, live in Storrs, and have two sons, Kit and Miles.

About Augur

Poetry. The augurs of ancient Rome were charged with studying natural phenomena, like the flight habits of birds, in order to look for propitious or unfavorable omens. The poems in AUGUR are attempts, in prescribed and open forms, to "decode" the signs of a world in the midst of tremendous and often bewildering upheaval. Written from the interlocking perspectives of father, husband, son, brother, educator, and citizen, the poetry in AUGUR seeks to engage life with clarity. Many of the poems are charged with the energies of the natural world, including the patterns of bird flight the augurs once looked to, not as an escape, but as a source of information and insight. Ultimately, we must inscribe the signs with meaning and reject the small priesthoods and corrupt officials who claim all vision (and power).

About Margaret Gibson

Margaret Gibson is the author of twelve collections of poems and one prose memoir. A native of Virginia, now a resident of Preston, Connecticut, she has received numerous honors, including the Lamont Selection, Connecticut Book Award, and Melville Kane Award. Her collection The Vigil was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry.
 
About Not Hearing the Wood Thrush
“I look about and find whatever I see / unfinished,” Margaret Gibson writes in these powerful and moving poems, which investigate a late-life genesis. Not Hearing the Wood Thrush grapples with the existential questions that come after experiencing a great personal loss. A number of poems meditate on loneliness and fear; others speak to “No one”―a name richer than prayer or vow.” In this transformative new collection, Gibson moves inward, taking surprising, mercurial turns of the imagination, guided by an original and probative intelligence. With a clear eye and an open heart, Gibson writes, “How stark it is to be alive”―and also how glorious, how curious, how intimate.
Event date: 
Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm
Event address: 
Bank Square Books
53 West Main Street
Mystic, CT 06355
Not Hearing the Wood Thrush: Poems Cover Image
$18.95
ISBN: 9780807168202
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: LSU Press - September 12th, 2018

"I look about and find whatever I see / unfinished," Margaret Gibson writes in these powerful and moving poems, which investigate a late-life genesis. Not Hearing the Wood Thrush grapples with the existential questions that come after experiencing a great personal loss.


Augur Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9781945063206
Availability: On Our Shelves Now
Published: Red Dragonfly Press - August 2018

Poetry. The augurs of ancient Rome were charged with studying natural phenomena, like the flight habits of birds, in order to look for propitious or unfavorable omens. The poems in AUGUR are attempts, in prescribed and open forms, to "decode" the signs of a world in the midst of tremendous and often bewildering upheaval.